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This May 24, 2013 photo provided by Benton County District Attorney’s Office shows Grant Alan Acord. Acord, a teenager accused of planning to bomb his high school, is expected to be arraigned Tuesday, May 28, 2013 on charges that include one count of attempted aggravated murder and six counts of manufacturing and possessing a destructive device, authorities said. Grant Acord, 17, was arrested Thursday night after police got a tip that he was making a bomb to blow up his high school south of Portland. (AP Photo/Benton County DA)

ALBANY, Ore. (AP) - When 17-year-old Truman Templeton didn't want to go to an assembly at his Oregon high school, his mother knew something was wrong.

She asked, and he said that a classmate had started talking about making bombs and had brought diagrams to West Albany High School.

His mother turned to a family friend, who told her, "I know exactly who to call."

Shannon Lewis, a juvenile probation officer for Linn County, told the Albany Democrat-Herald ( http://bit.ly/15j6CLo) she relayed the mother's information to the Albany Police Department's tip line, and an officer put her in touch with the 911 dispatch center.

Grant Acord, 17, was arrested that night at his father's house in North Albany. Investigators found evidence of bomb-making and two bombs at his mother's home.

Acord is charged with attempted aggravated murder and possession and manufacture of explosive devices. He is to be tried as an adult. He has not yet entered a plea.

Templeton told KATU-TV ( http://bit.ly/12MQfop) that Acord bragged he could make bombs, raising suspicions in the past few months. He said another friend saw a bomb or bomb components at Acord's house, and Acord brought books about bomb-making to school.

"The tipping point for me when I was just worried about being in school," Templeton said. "OK, school is supposed to be a safe and secure environment. I should not have to worry about this kind of stuff."

Templeton said he hadn't known what police would find, if anything, at Acord's home.

"When I saw video of bomb squads and people in hazmat suits putting evidence in these bags and dumping chemicals, I realized this was a serious operation," he said. "If I hadn't come forward with the information I had, this could have been a lot worse."

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Information from: Albany Democrat-Herald, http://www.dhonline.com


(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
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